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Aesop and Ananse: Animal Fables and Trickster Tales
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CC BY
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In this unit, students will become familiar with fables and trickster tales from different cultural traditions and will see how stories change when transferred orally between generations and cultures. They will learn how both types of folktales employ various animals in different ways to portray human strengths and weaknesses and to pass down wisdom from one generation to the next. Use the following lessons to introduce students to world folklore and to explore how folktales convey the perspectives of different world cultures.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
06/17/2021
Animal Farm: Allegory and the Art of Persuasion
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CC BY
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Allegories are similar to metaphors: in both the author uses one subject to represent another, seemingly unrelated, subject. However, unlike metaphors, which are generally short and contained within a few lines, an allegory extends its representation over the course of an entire story, novel, or poem. This lesson plan will introduce students to the concept of allegory by using George Orwell’s widely read novella, Animal Farm, which is available on Project Gutenberg.

Subject:
Literature
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
06/17/2021
Arabic Poetry: Guzzle a Ghazal!
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The Bedouins of ancient Arabia and Persia made poetry a conversational art form. Several poetic forms developed from the participatory nature of tribal poetry. Today in most Arabic cultures, you may still experience public storytelling and spontaneous poetry challenges in the streets. The art of turning a rhyme into sly verbal sparring is considered a mark of intelligence and a badge of honor. Students will learn about the origins and structure of Arabic Poetry.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
06/17/2021
Beatrix Potter's Naughty Animal Tales
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Through studying Beatrix Potter's stories and illustrations from the early 1900s and learning about her childhood in Victorian England, students can compare/contrast these with their own world to understand why Potter wrote such simple stories and why she wrote about animals rather than people.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
06/17/2021
Being in the Noh: An Introduction to Japanese Noh Plays
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
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Noh, the oldest surviving Japanese dramatic form, combines elements of dance, drama, music, and poetry into a highly stylized, aesthetic retelling of a well-known story from Japanese literature, such as The Tale of Genji or The Tale of the Heike. This lesson provides an introduction to the elements of Noh plays and to the text of two plays, and provides opportunities for students to compare the conventions of the Noh play with other dramatic forms with which they may already be familiar, such as the ancient Greek dramas of Sophocles. By reading classic examples of Noh plays, such as Atsumori, students will learn to identify the structure, characters, style, and stories typical to this form of drama. Students will expand their grasp of these conventions by using them to write the introduction to a Noh play of their own.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
06/17/2021
A Story of Epic Proportions: What makes a Poem an Epic?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Some of the most the most essential works of literature in the world are examples of epic poetry, such as The Odyssey and Paradise Lost. This lesson introduces students to the epic poem form and to its roots in oral tradition.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
06/17/2021
Three Shots: Ernest Hemingway's Nick Adams
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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In this lesson, students study issues related to independence and notions of manliness in Ernest Hemingway’s “Three Shots” as they conduct in-depth literary character analysis, consider the significance of environment to growing up and investigate Hemingway’s Nobel Prize-winning, unique prose style. In addition, they will have the opportunity to write and revise a short story based on their own childhood experiences and together create a short story collection.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
06/17/2021