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The Dogon and the Dama
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The Dama is the rite of passage for the men of the Dogon tribe. Conditions must be just right before a Dama can take place, and in the village of Tireli, in Mali, it is the responsibility of the oldest man in the village, the revered "Keeper of the Masks," to determine the timing of the Dama. In this video segment from the series Africa, young men in Tireli feel suspended between boyhood and manhood because there has not been a Dama in the village in 20 years. There is a conflict. A spirit told the village fortune teller that the next Dama would herald the village elder's death, and so the old man believes that if he organizes a Dama he will die.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
PBS
Date Added:
08/13/2021
Storytelling Helps Young English Learners Grow
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Learn how an early childhood education program uses dramatic play and storytelling to help pre-K students learn English with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from November 23, 2015.

Subject:
Early Childhood Development
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
PBS NewsHour
Date Added:
05/12/2022
Teacher Tools: Where in Africa
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Start Your Expedition!
Home to half of the continent's animal species, Africa's vast rainforests are falling silent. Deforestation, road construction and slash-and-burn farming have already wiped out roughly 90 percent of the West Africa's rainforests. Now, the rainforests of Central Africa's Congo Basin, the second largest in the world after the Amazon, have come under the axe, too.

For centuries, only scattered groups of native hunter-gatherers and Bantu-speaking subsistence farmers disturbed the forest realm. Then, in the 19th century, European loggers and plantation owners moved in. One of the worst cases of rainforest exploitation took place in the Belgian colony of Congo (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo) where thousands of forced laborers died in the scramble to harvest wild rubber.

Today, the governments of rainforest countries are now torn between the need to protect their endangered rainforests and the need for the money, roads and jobs that foreign logging companies bring in. Growing populations, swollen by war refugees, are razing rainforest to make way for farm land; poachers are picking off chimpanzees and gorillas to sell to the profitable bushmeat trade.

Will the Congo Basin follow the fate of West Africa? Maybe not. In 1999, the six countries of the Congo Basin -- Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea -- pledged to harmonize forestry laws and form a joint watchdog system to track the effects of logging and poaching. One year later, they took the first step toward putting that pledge into action: the creation of the tri-national Sangha Park, a reserve that will cover more than one million hectares of rainforest in Cameroon, the Central African Republic and the Republic of Congo.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Arts and Humanities
Education
English Language Arts
World History
Anthropology
Ethnic Studies
Linguistics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture Notes
Author:
PBS
Date Added:
08/13/2021
West Africa before the Europeans
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Students will read a secondary text describing aspects of West African society, including descriptions of agriculture, industry, and political organization. They will then take notes in a graphic organizer provided. Finally, they will analyze the relationship between these three elements by crafting an essay.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Author:
PBS
Date Added:
08/13/2021