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  • Anatomy/Physiology
7.3 Metabolic Reactions
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CC BY
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This unit on metabolic reactions in the human body starts out with students exploring a real case study of a middle-school girl named M’Kenna, who reported some alarming symptoms to her doctor. Her symptoms included an inability to concentrate, headaches, stomach issues when she eats, and a lack of energy for everyday activities and sports that she used to play regularly. She also reported noticeable weight loss over the past few months, in spite of consuming what appeared to be a healthy diet. Her case sparks questions and ideas for investigations around trying to figure out which pathways and processes in M’Kenna’s body might be functioning differently than a healthy system and why.

Students investigate data specific to M’Kenna’s case in the form of doctor’s notes, endoscopy images and reports, growth charts, and micrographs. They also draw from their results from laboratory experiments on the chemical changes involving the processing of food and from digital interactives to explore how food is transported, transformed, stored, and used across different body systems in all people. Through this work of figuring out what is causing M’Kenna’s symptoms, the class discovers what happens to the food we eat after it enters our bodies and how M’Kenna’s different symptoms are connected.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Data Set
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Reading
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Abingdon-Avon High School Betty Stennett
Assessment Specialist Kelsey Edwards
BSCS Science Learning Jamie Noll
BSCS Science Learning Katie Van Horne
BSCS Science Learning Lindsey Mohan
Charles A. Dana Center at University of Texas Austin Heather Galbreath
John D. O’Bryant School of Mathematics and Science Nicole Vick
Lombard Middle School Michael Clinchot
Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance Kathryn Fattalah
Northwestern University Barbara Hug
Northwestern University Barbara Taylor
Northwestern University Kate Cook-Whitt
Northwestern University Michael Novak
Tara McGill
The Nora Project Emily Harris
Date Added:
03/15/2022
Abdominal Cavity and Laparoscopic Surgery
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Educational Use
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For students interested in studying biomechanical engineering, especially in the field of surgery, this lesson serves as an anatomy and physiology primer of the abdominopelvic cavity. Students are introduced to the abdominopelvic cavity—a region of the body that is the focus of laparoscopic surgery—as well as the benefits and drawbacks of laparoscopic surgery. Understanding the abdominopelvic environment and laparoscopic surgery is critical for biomechanical engineers who design laparoscopic surgical tools.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Benjamin S. Terry
Brandi N. Briggs
Denise W. Carlson
Stephanie Rivale
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Active and Passive Transport: Red Rover Send Particles Over
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Educational Use
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Students compare and contrast passive and active transport by playing a game to model this phenomenon. Movement through cell membranes is also modeled, as well as the structure and movement typical of the fluid mosaic model of the cell membrane. Concentration gradient, sizes, shapes and polarity of molecules determine the method of movement through cell membranes. This activity is associated with the Test your Mettle phase of the legacy cycle.

Subject:
Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Melinda M. Higgins
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Anatomy and Physiology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Anatomy and Physiology is a dynamic textbook for the two-semester human anatomy and physiology course for life science and allied health majors. The book is organized by body system and covers standard scope and sequence requirements. Its lucid text, strategically constructed art, career features, and links to external learning tools address the critical teaching and learning challenges in the course. The web-based version of Anatomy and Physiology also features links to surgical videos, histology, and interactive diagrams.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Author:
Brandon Poe
Dean H. Kruse
Eddie Johnson
James A. Wise
J. Gordon Betts
Jody E. Johnson
Kelly A. Young
Mark Womble
Oksana Korol
Peter DeSaix
Date Added:
03/06/2013
Anatomy of a neuron
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Neurons (or nerve cells) are specialized cells that transmit and receive electrical signals in the body. Neurons are composed of three main parts: dendrites, a cell body, and an axon. Signals are received through the dendrites, travel to the cell body, and continue down the axon until they reach the synapse (the communication point between two neurons).

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Khan Academy
Author:
Sal Khan
Date Added:
02/11/2010
Biomedical Devices for the Eyes
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Educational Use
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Students examine the structure and function of the human eye, learning some amazing features about our eyes, which provide us with sight and an understanding of our surroundings. Students also learn about some common eye problems and the biomedical devices and medical procedures that resolve or help to lessen the effects of these vision deficiencies, including vision correction surgery.

Subject:
Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Lesley Herrmann
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
William Surles
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Blind Spot
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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The eye’s retina receives and reacts to incoming light and sends signals to the brain, allowing you to see. One part of the retina, however, doesn't give you visual information—this is your eye’s “blind spot.”

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Provider Set:
Science Snacks
Date Added:
03/15/2022
Body Control Center
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Educational Use
Rating
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Throughout the day, your nervous system monitors and makes endless adjustments to your body's basic systems -- all to keep you alive. This interactive feature illustrates the complexity of such a task.

Subject:
Life Science
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
09/26/2003
Bone Fractures and Engineering
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Educational Use
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Students learn about the role engineers and engineering play in repairing severe bone fractures. They acquire knowledge about the design and development of implant rods, pins, plates, screws and bone grafts. They learn about materials science, biocompatibility and minimally-invasive surgery.

Subject:
Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Todd Curtis
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Bones! Bones! Bones!
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Educational Use
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After learning, comparing and contrasting the steps of the engineering design process (EDP) and scientific method, students review the human skeletal system, including the major bones, bone types, bone functions and bone tissues, as well as other details about bone composition. Students then pair-read an article about bones and bone growth and compile their notes to summarize the article. Finally, students complete a homework assignment to review the major bones in the human body, preparing them for the associated activities in which they create and test prototype replacement bones with appropriate densities. Two PowerPoint(TM) presentations, pre-/post-test, handout and worksheet are provided.

Subject:
Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Carleigh Samson
Dua Chaker
Jeanne Hubelbank
Kristen Billiar
Michelle Gallagher
Terri Camesano
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Breathe In, Breathe Out
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Educational Use
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Students are introduced to the respiratory system, the lungs and air. They learn about how the lungs and diaphragm work, how air pollution affects lungs and respiratory functions, some widespread respiratory problems, and how engineers help us stay healthy by designing machines and medicines that support respiratory health and function.

Subject:
Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Jay Shah
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Can It Support You? No Bones about It!
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Educational Use
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After completing the associated lesson and its first associated activity, students are familiar with the 20 major bones in the human body knowing their locations and relative densities. When those bones break, lose their densities or are destroyed, we look to biomedical engineers to provide replacements. In this activity, student pairs are challenged to choose materials and create prototypes that could replace specific bones. They follow the steps of the engineering design process, researching, brainstorming, prototyping and testing to find bone replacement solutions. Specifically, they focus on identifying substances that when combined into a creative design might provide the same density (and thus strength and support) as their natural counterparts. After iterations to improve their designs, they present their bone alternative solutions to the rest of the class. They refer to the measured and calculated densities for fabricated human bones calculated in the previous activity, and conduct Internet research to learn the densities of given fabrication materials (or measure/calculate those densities if not found online).

Subject:
Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Jeanne Hubelbank
Kristen Billiar
Michelle Gallagher
Terri Camesano
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Challenges of Laparoscopic Surgery
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Educational Use
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Students teams use a laparoscopic surgical trainer to perform simple laparoscopic surgery tasks (dissections, sutures) using laparoscopic tools. Just like in the operating room, where the purpose is to perform surgery carefully and quickly to minimize patient trauma, students' surgery time and mistakes are observed and recorded to quantify their performances. They learn about the engineering component of surgery.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Life Science
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Benjamin S. Terry
Brandi N. Briggs
Denise W. Carlson
Stephanie Rivale
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Digestion Simulation
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Educational Use
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To reinforce students' understanding of the human digestion process, the functions of several stomach and small intestine fluids are analyzed, and the concept of simulation is introduced through a short, introductory demonstration of how these fluids work. Students learn what simulation means and how it relates to the engineering process, particularly in biomedical engineering. The teacher demo requires vinegar, baking soda, water and aspirin.

Subject:
Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Jacob Crosby
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Digestive System
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Educational Use
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The digestive system is amazing: it takes the foods we eat and breaks them into smaller components that our body can use for energy, cell repair and growth. This lesson introduces students to the main parts of the digestive system and how they interact. In addition, students learn about some of the challenges astronauts face when trying to eat in outer space.

Subject:
Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Abigail Watrous
Denali Lander
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Sara Born
Date Added:
09/18/2014